Folk Costume

Hello everyone! Long time, no see. Honestly, I had a very hard time for many years with my blog, with a huge amount of writers block induced by self-inflicted pressure and anxiety, which mainly was rooted in me not thinking I was good enough. In short: A Whole Lot of Performance Anxiety and a Great Deal of Imposter Syndrome. That, in combination of always having something going on – study, work or crafting wise – made me very stressed and the fun of writing a blog disappeared. In the meantime, about two years ago, I took up knitting and have almost made no historical things since then. Instead I started a second blog, a knitting blog in Swedish which is called Med Ull på Stickorna (Wool on the Needles), where I share my knitting journey. Feel free to check it out! 😀

An example of one of my latest knitting project – a test knit of the Noma Sweater

What I have done that is history related is to get myself a folk costume. I grew up in Blekinge, the smallest county in Sweden (or second smallest, depending on how you count), and it has a rich history of locally distinctive commonwear. The festive wear of these people in the mid 19th century is what then became the Blekinge Folk Costume. Or Blekingedräkt in Swedish.

My plan is for this blog to change it’s course a little bit. Of course still keeping to reenactment and my medieval journey when I feel like I have the want to both make things and write stuff related to it, but for now I’m so inspired by the whole folk costume thing that I feel that it is what I’ll get the most out of writing about.

But – your blogs name is Recreating History?!
Yes! It is. And folk costume really ties in to that. For me, sewing and using my folk costume is basically the same thing as reenactment of any other period. I go back to written sources and extant originals to look at materials, techniques and how/when things were worn. In the beginning now I’m recreating the very best and fanciest of what a relative of mine could have worn for the finest occasions in the mid 19th century, and as my long-time goal I wan’t to make something that could be considered everyday wear of that same relative. Quite the same way as how I approach my 14th century reenactment.

In the coming months – i.e. when I feel like it – I will update this blog with posts about the different pieces and projects I have of my Blekingedräkt. In the mean time I’m sharing some photos from when my sister turned 25 and my mum and I gifted her as a birthday present her very own Blekingedräkt.

Interested in more about the Blekinge folk costume? Definitely check out Blekingelivet, a blog/project run by the amazing women Lina, Kerstin & Lisa here: http://blekingelivet.blogspot.com/
Also, check out my Pinterest board on Blekingedräkt here: https://www.pinterest.se/andreahakansson/folkdr%C3%A4kt-blekinge/

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